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Floored by Love Lesbian Movie Review

Directed by Desiree Lim

About.com Rating 3.5 Star Rating

By

Floored by Love Lesbian Movie Review
© Wolfe Video
  • 2006
  • 50 Minutes

The Return of Lesbian Movie Night

The fall rains have arrived in the Pacific Northwest and that means one thing: movie night! Yea! Grab the beer (a finely crafted microbrew), the babe (my lovely wife), and the bon-bons (dark chocolate preferred) and this Lesbian Life movie reviewer is so good to go.

Funny, Family-Friendly Lesbians?

© Wolfe Video
I recently rented Floored by Love, directed by Desiree Lim, also known for her acclaimed Sugar Sweet. Intrigued by the DVD cover that billed the film as a “double-comedy” and “family-friendly”, I thought to myself, is this really a lesbian flick? Exponentially funny lesbians who are the portrait of family values? Must be a foreign film. Sure enough, it’s based in British Columbia.

A Double-Comedy

I quickly figured out that “double-comedy” did not mean double the lesbian pleasure, double the lesbian fun. (Ha! A Projection! Gees, I’m learning a ton in therapy.) Rather, that the film focuses on parallel plot lines that mingle and converge at the end.

Story One

Story One features Janet and Cara. Together for three years, Janet wants to marry Cara now that Canada has legalized same-sex marriage—those lucky bitches! But Cara is hesitant. She is afraid that her traditional Chinese parents, to whom she has not yet come out, will not approve. Who will she choose? What life will she lead, one of hiding and closets, or one of self-acceptance and determination? Note that Cara is a Social Worker. What have you been doing for three years, honey? Rooming together?

Story Two

Story Two centers on Jessie, a teenager who has recently realized his queer identity and come out to his family. His family embraces him, unconditionally. (Anyone want to send a copy to Dick Cheney?) The conflict resides in Jessie’s desire to spend time with his biological father, a flamboyant gay actor who has repeatedly chosen fame over parenting, rather than with his step-dad, Norman, the straight but steady presence in Jessie’s life.

Uniting Themes

© Wolfe Video
The stories collide at the end in a silly and sweet yet somewhat predictable way. I think you can sense the uniting themes of longing, acceptance, and the search for self. Truly gay themes and experiences, but more broadly and universally, human ones.

I rate it 3 ½ stars. Go rent it, the perfect antidote for a misty evening.

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